Importance of Fire Safety and Prevention Planning
Written by webtechs

What Is A Fire Safety Plan?

Read on to learn some of the elements you need to have in place as part of a fire safety plan.

A fire safety plan is a comprehensive set of procedures and measures designed to prevent fires, ensure the safety of individuals in case of a fire emergency, and minimize property damage. It outlines the steps to be taken in preventing fires, as well as the actions to be followed in the event of a fire outbreak.

  • The appointment and organization of designated supervisory staff by position, with related duties and responsibilities during an emergency.
  • Instructions for building occupants and staff on fire prevention methods and what to do in case of fire.
  • The method of training supervisory staff for fire emergencies.
  • The method and frequency of conducting fire drills.
  • The control of fire hazards throughout the building.
  • Detailed maintenance procedures for fire protection systems and building facilities.
  • The identification of alternate fire safety measures in the event of a temporary shutdown of fire protection equipment or systems so that occupant safety can be maximized.
  • Floor plans that feature the type, location and operation of fire protection systems, access for firefighting and all exit facilities.
  • Detailed instructions for supervisory staff on the use of any emergency equipment, such as the voice communication system, the fire alarm system, smoke control system or emergency power supply system.
  • Procedures for the use of elevators and the evacuation of building occupants requiring special assistance.
  • Established procedures for assisting the fire department in accessing the building and locating the fire. For large facilities, it is recommended that floor plans showing exit locations be posted on each floor.
  • An Accountability System that can account for all building occupants following an evacuation, including notification to the fire department of any missing occupants and their last known location.

A typical fire safety plan includes the following components:

Fire Prevention Measures: This section covers measures to reduce the risk of fire, such as proper storage and handling of flammable materials, regular maintenance of electrical systems, and ensuring smoking regulations are followed.

Emergency Notification: The plan should outline how to alert occupants and authorities in the event of a fire, including procedures for activating fire alarms and notifying emergency services.

Evacuation Procedures: This section details the steps to be taken when a fire occurs, including evacuation routes, assembly points, and procedures for assisting people with disabilities or special needs. It may also include guidelines for conducting fire drills to ensure everyone is familiar with the evacuation process.

Firefighting Equipment: The plan should specify the location and proper use of fire extinguishers, fire hoses, sprinkler systems, and any other firefighting equipment available on the premises.

Responsibilities and Roles: It is important to assign responsibilities to designated personnel, such as fire wardens or marshals, who will coordinate the evacuation process and ensure everyone is accounted for.

Training and Education: Regular training sessions should be conducted to educate occupants about fire safety procedures, including how to use firefighting equipment and respond appropriately during a fire emergency.

Building Information: The plan should include detailed information about the building’s layout, including floor plans, exits, stairwells, and utility shut-off points. This information aids firefighters in locating and controlling the fire.

Regular Plan Review: Fire safety plans should be reviewed and updated periodically to ensure they remain current and effective. Changes in building occupancy, layout, or fire safety regulations may require updates to the plan.

By implementing and regularly reviewing a fire safety plan, individuals and organizations can enhance the safety of occupants, reduce the risk of fire incidents, and be better prepared to respond effectively in case of emergencies.

Waterline Controls™

Our level sensors and controls aren’t just for use in residential potable water holding tanks; some of the other applications include cooling towers, sump pumps, wastewater, boilers, water storage tanks, and building fire protection water tanks.

Types of Metering Devices
Written by webtechs

Types of Metering Devices

Displacement and velocity are the two most popular methods for measuring flow, and each one uses a different set of technologies. The oscillating piston and nutating disc meters are examples of typical displacement designs. Turbine meters and single- and multi-jet meters are examples of velocity-based designs.

Additionally, there are non-mechanical designs including electromagnetic and ultrasonic meters as well as meters made for specific purposes. In a normal water distribution system, the majority of meters are only intended to measure cold potable water. Design materials for specialty hot water meters can tolerate higher temperatures. Reclaimed water meters have unique lavender register covers to indicate that the water should not be consumed.

There are other electromechanical meters, such as automatic meter reading meters and prepaid water meters. The latter combines a mechanical water meter with an electronic measurement component and an LCD. The signal output for mechanical water meters often comes from a reed switch, hall, or photoelectric coding register. Data are sent to the LCD or sent to an information management system after processing by the microcontroller unit (MCU) in the electronic module.

A public water provider, whether a city, rural water association, or private water corporation, often owns, reads, and maintains water meters. In some instances, a utility may bill the owner of a mobile home park, apartment building, or commercial structure based on the reading of one meter, with the costs being divided among the tenants according to some sort of key (size of the apartment, the number of occupants, or by separately monitoring the water consumption of each unit, a practice known as submetering).

WATER DISPLACEMENT METER

Positive displacement, or “PD” meters, are the usual name for displacement meters. Nutating disk meters and oscillating piston meters are two popular varieties. In either case, the movable measuring element is physically displaced by the water in direct proportion to the water flow through the meter. The piston or disk moves the register’s driving magnet.

At the low-to-moderate flow rates typical of household and small business users, PD meters are typically fairly precise and typically range in size from 5/8″ to 2″. Displacement meters often are not practicable in big commercial applications needing high flow rates or little pressure loss since they depend on all water flowing through the meter to “push” the measurement element. The measuring element of PD meters is typically shielded from rocks and other objects that could halt or break it by an integrated strainer. PD meters typically have plastic, bronze, brass, or moldable plastic bodies with stainless steel and plastic measurement chambers inside.

WATER VELOCITY METER

A velocity-type meter calculates the flow rate through a known internal capacity meter. The utilization can then be calculated by converting the flow’s speed into its volume. Water flow velocity can be measured by a variety of meters, including single-jet and multi-jet jet meters, turbine meters, propeller meters, and mag meters. The majority of velocity-based meters contain an adjustment vane to allow for the meter’s accuracy calibration.

SEVERAL-JET METER

Multi-jet meters are frequently used in sizes between 5/8″ and 2″ for home and small commercial users since they are particularly precise in tiny sizes. The water jets produced by multi-jet meters are directed against an impeller whose rotational speed is governed by the water flow velocity through a series of ports around an interior chamber. Multi-jets are exceedingly precise at low flow rates, but as they lack the straight-through flow channel required for high flow rates used in big pipe diameters, there are no large size meters. The internal strainer feature of multi-jet meters often prevents the jet ports from becoming clogged. Typically, multi-jet meters feature bronze alloy bodies or outside casings, with contemporary thermoplastics and stainless steel used to make the inside measuring components.

CONVERGENCE METER

At low flow rates, turbine meters are less precise than displacement and jet meters, but the measuring element does not completely obstruct or substantially impede the flow stream. In comparison to displacement-type meters, the flow direction through the meter is often straight, allowing for larger flow rates and less pressure loss. For large business users, fire protection, and master meters for the water distribution system, they are the preferred type of meter. In order to protect the measuring element from gravel or other particles that can enter the water distribution system, strainers must often be positioned in front of the meter. Turbine meters are typically offered for pipe sizes ranging from 1-12″ to 12″ or higher. Bronze, cast iron, or ductile iron are frequently used as materials for turbine meter bodies. Plastic or non-corrosive metal alloys can be used as internal turbine elements. Although the flow profile and fluid conditions have a significant impact, they are correct under normal working conditions.

Specialized turbine meters called “fire meters” can handle the high flow rates needed for fire protection. They frequently have Factory Mutual (FM) or Underwriters Laboratories (UL) approval for use in fire protection.

In order to measure the amount of water flowing out of a fire hydrant, special portable turbine meters called fire hydrant meters are mounted to the hydrant. The meters typically have a 3′′ capacity and are manufactured of aluminum to keep weight to a minimum. They are frequently required by utilities for monitoring water consumption on building sites, for filling swimming pools, or in other locations without permanent meters.

COMBINATION METER
When high flow rates are required yet occasionally smaller flow rates also need to be precisely recorded, a compound meter is utilized. A check valve controls the flow between the two measuring parts of compound meters. Water is typically routed mostly or entirely to the high flow element at high flow rates. A turbine meter is often used as the high flow component. A check valve closes to direct water to a smaller element that can monitor the lower flow rates precisely when flow rates fall to the point where the high flow element can no longer record them reliably. A multi-jet or PD meter is often the low flow component. The utility keeps track of the overall amount of water consumed by summing the values recorded by the high and low elements.

Electrical flow meter
Although technically a velocity-type water meter, magnetic flow meters, sometimes known as “mag meters,” calculate the water flow velocity using electromagnetic qualities as opposed to the mechanical methods employed by jet and turbine meters. The electromagnets in mag meters must be powered by AC or DC electricity from a power line or battery in order to function, and they use the physics principle of Faraday’s law of induction for measurement. Mag meters often have the advantage of being able to measure flow in any direction since they lack a mechanical measuring device. Instead, they employ electronics to measure and totalize the flow. Since there is no mechanical measuring element that can be clogged or damaged by debris flowing through the meter, mag meters can also be effective for measuring raw (untreated/unfiltered) water and waste-water. Since there is no measuring element in the stream of flow that could be harmed, mag meters do not require strainers. The majority of mag meters are built with either grounding rings or grounding electrodes to direct stray electricity away from the electrodes used to measure the flow inside the flow tube since stray electrical energy flowing through the flow tube might result in false results.

USING ULTRASONIC METER
In order to measure the water’s velocity, ultrasonic water meters use one or more ultrasonic transducers to send ultrasonic sound waves through the fluid. When the velocity of the water is measured, it is possible to determine the volume of water passing through the meter with a high degree of accuracy since the cross-sectional area of the meter body is a set and known value. Most ultrasonic water meters measure the water temperature as part of the volume computation since water density varies with temperature.

In water metering, there are 2 main ultrasonic measurement techniques used:

Doppler effect meters that use the Doppler Effect to calculate how fast water is moving through the device.
Transit Time meters are used to determine how long it takes an ultrasonic signal to travel between two or more fixed sites within the meter.
The design of ultrasonic meters can either be “clamp-on” or “flow-through.” Designs known as “flow-through” are those in which the water flows straight through the meter; they are frequently used in residential or commercial settings. For bigger diameters when the sensors are placed to the outside of pipelines, etc., clamp-on types are typically employed.

Residential meters can measure down to 0.01 gallons or 0.001 cubic feet, making ultrasonic water meters (if built in) often quite accurate. Additionally, because they don’t have any internal mechanical components that could break down, they offer broad flow measurement ranges, need no maintenance, and last a very long time. Ultrasonic meters have been utilized in commercial applications for many years, despite being relatively new to the American water utility sector, and are gaining popularity because of their benefits over conventional mechanical designs.

ADVANCED WATER METER
Depending on the type of payment, meters might be postpaid or prepaid. Electromagnetic and ultrasonic meters, as well as the majority of mechanical water meters, are prepaid models. Prepaid water meters allow users to prepay for a specific volume of water at a vending machine. On a piece of media, like an IC or RF type card, the amount of water credited is recorded. The primary distinction is whether the card requires interaction with the prepaid water meter’s processing section. In some places, the interface for entering the water credit on a prepaid water meter is a keypad.

 

Types of Metering Devices
Written by webtechs

How Does a Pump Station Work?

Water pumping stations are devices that can be used to move water from one location to another without the direct involvement of people or animals. These machines may circulate water in treatment systems, supply water to canals, and even drain water from low-lying land.

In these kinds of applications, water pumps are typically only taken into account if simple gravity-based drainage is not an option. It is uncommon to utilize water pumping stations to remove water from high sites because it is frequently more simpler to just dig a canal and allow the water flow naturally downhill to the appropriate gathering area. On the other hand, water pumping stations that transport water to elevated sites are fairly prevalent. Water pumping stations are necessary in this situation because, for instance, residents who live on hillsides must transport the water they use to their homes uphill.

What Function Do Water Pumping Stations Serve?

The pumping station needs to produce enough pressure to drive the water against gravity. When this pressure is reached, there will be sufficient pressure to transfer liquid at the required flow rate. This is a straightforward mathematical equation, and pumps are made to be programmable in order to make changing the water flow rate simple. The necessary data is entered into an electronic controller that is either directly connected to the pumping station itself or controlled from a remote location. The calculation takes into consideration all of the pipes (including their size), new fittings, elevation changes, and any other elements that can have an impact on the water system’s pressure.

When determining the pressure required to overcome the system pressure and start the water flowing, it’s important to take into account the dimensions of the pipe entrance, any directional changes in the piping (such as 45- and 90-degree bends), various types of valves, as well as the dimensions of any outlets along the system. The many qualities of the liquid that is to be pumped must be considered in this computation. Therefore, it’s important to consider the amount of friction that water causes on the piping as well as the roughness factor. Water and other liquids will have very little friction, but sewage and chemicals may be aggressive and require more force to pass through the pipeline.

Regulatory Issues Regarding Water Pumping Stations

Older water pumping stations may be found on many people’s properties in England and Wales, either directly beneath them or nearby. In the past, local governments or private owners constructed these devices. However, in England and Wales, legislation was approved in 2016 that gave local water companies ownership of private pumping stations. There are several outdated pumps that require extensive maintenance. Many of them were constructed during the Victorian era, and some of them are now protected historical landmarks.

The challenge of locating and cataloguing every pumping station in England and Wales is challenging, and surveying work is still being done today. If you have a pumping station on your property, it could be worthwhile to find out if the upkeep is the responsibility of the neighborhood water company.

Risk Reduction Through Water Pumping

Numerous threats to residential, commercial, and industrial sectors can be reduced with the use of water pumps. Lack of pumping causes stagnant water to accumulate in sewer systems, where it can harbor bacteria and diseases. In such a condition, hazardous gasses like hydrogen sulfide can accumulate and pose a serious risk to the populace if ingested. There is little risk of gasses building up as a result of stagnation because sufficient pumping ensures that the raw sewage is moving at a steady flow.

In densely populated places, insufficient pumping can also cause water to surge up from the system and flood basements and ground floors of buildings.

In the United Kingdom, water pumping stations are used to move water along canals, move groundwater, move water for hydraulic power plants, and provide public water supply and sewage services.

Why Choose Water Line Controls

All of our water level controls and water level control systems are assembled right here in the U.S.A. where we monitor every step of the process.

Sewage Lift Station Costs
Written by webtechs

What’s The Best Tank Level Sensor?

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that you’ve probably heard of if you follow technological advancement in the industrial sector. The IoT is fundamentally altering the game, and now is the time to participate.

But where do you even begin? Tank level monitoring is one example.

Tank level monitoring (TLM) is an excellent first step towards becoming familiar with the IoT, whether you’re tracking frac tank levels for a well stimulation project or monitoring a straightforward water tank. The objective of tank level monitoring, as with any IoT project, is to gather accurate and trustworthy data so that you can take action and produce results. People won’t trust your tank monitoring system if your data is inaccurate, lacking, or late, and you won’t receive the desired business outcomes.

Tank level sensors are the “bedrock” of any solution for remote tank monitoring. Your sensors are the first stop on the data route for tank level monitoring since they produce the information that eventually supports decision-making. Nothing else matters if your tank level sensors don’t get reliable data. The greatest analytics and most attractive dashboards cannot compensate for subpar tank sensors.

It’s true what they say: “Garbage in, garbage out.”

We wanted to discuss how to select the best tank level sensor for your project because of how crucial tank level sensors are to your whole tank monitoring system. You may purchase accurate and trustworthy tank sensors that generate excellent field data without spending a fortune with a little help.

Five Typical Tank Level Sensor Types
Tank level sensors come in five different categories:

water-pressure sensors
ultrasound detectors
Infrared sensors
Float detectors
Sensitive capacitors

Your application will determine which tank level sensor is ideal, so we’ll outline the main benefits and drawbacks of each sensor to assist you in making an informed decision for your tank level monitoring project.

Sensors for Hydrostatic Tank Level
A tried-and-true method for obtaining affordable, precise tank level data is using hydrostatic tank level sensors. These sensors are used to gauge the fluid column’s hydrostatic pressure. Typically, hydrostatics are mounted to discharge piping at the bottom of tanks, submerged in the liquid at the tank bottom.

Hydrostatic tank level sensors can be installed in various types of tanks without the need to create a new sensor because they are affordable, accurate, power-efficient, and have variable ranges.

Unfortunately, because hydrostatic sensors are frequently entirely submerged in liquid, they can experience greater failure rates. This can be quite difficult, especially with corrosive or caustic solutions. The cable gland, where fluids can enter and short circuit the delicate electronics that power the sensor, is one of the most frequent locations for failure in hydrostatic sensors.

Tank level ultrasonic sensors
Ultrasonic tank level sensors, as their name suggests, assess liquid levels using sound waves. They are installed on top of your tanks, use ultrasonic waves to “bounce” off the liquids’ surfaces, and gauge level by timing how long it takes to hear the “echo.”

The fact that ultrasonic sensors are non-contact, meaning they don’t make direct contact with the liquid in the tank, is one of its key advantages. They can operate well in tanks with mixers or other moving mechanical parts in the liquid, and you don’t have to worry as much about their compatibility with those fluids. However, the mixers must be turned off for accurate level readings because sloshing and turbulence interfere with ultrasonic sensors.

Additionally, the cost of these sensors is reasonable, ranging from $300 to $400 per sensor. If you want greater performance or hazardous area certifications, though, budget closer to $1,000.

The fact that ultrasonic sensors use a lot of electricity is one of their key drawbacks. They can need 10-100 times as much power as hydrostatic sensors, hence they are often not appropriate for battery-powered installations.

Additionally, compared to other sensors, ultrasonic sensors typically require more upkeep. They must be installed correctly, a dead band or “blanking zone” must be maintained between the sensor and the fluid, and the detecting element must occasionally be cleaned (certain fluids can produce a film that degrades performance).

Last but not least, noise interference is a major threat to ultrasonic sensors. The ultrasonic waves that travel to and from your sensors can encounter problems if there is foam or vapor present.

Tank level sensors using radar
In that they gauge tank levels by the amount of time it takes radio waves to travel between the sensors and fluid surfaces, radar sensors are comparable to ultrasonic sensors in this regard. Like ultrasonic sensors, radar sensors are non-contact, which appeals to operators. However, compared to their sound-based predecessors, radar sensors are more accurate and better equipped to withstand interference because of more precise electronics.

 

Radar sensors are often substantially more expensive when compared to the other two gadgets we’ve discussed so far. A competent radar tank level sensor should cost more than $2,000 in total. Radar still requires a substantial blanking zone between the bottom of the sensor and the top of the tank despite the more precise electronics. It can be challenging to obtain precise measurements as tanks fill due to the fact that light waves move so much more quickly than sound.

One advantage of radar sensors is their ability to measure fluid interfaces, such as the presence of oil in water. Even a small amount of emulsion between the interface can be taken into account by more sophisticated electronics while maintaining reliable measurements.

Sensors for Float Tank Level
Float sensors extend a probe into the liquids near the bottom of your tank, and they have continuous detecting elements along the probe that are activated by floats. Float tank sensors may be made to be extremely accurate using this approach. They can even monitor fluid interfaces by utilizing numerous floats for various liquid densities because they don’t suffer from noise or interference issues.

Float sensors, on the other hand, can be very pricey. The price of a float sensor is almost immediately inversely correlated with tank height. You might pay $1,000–$2,000 for shorter tanks (less than 5 feet tall). On the other hand, larger tanks exceeding 25 feet may cost up to $3,000 or more.

“Sticking” is one problem that float tank sensors may have. Although some manufacturers’ recent technological innovations have addressed this issue in some circumstances, it can still arise in certain circumstances. For instance, floats may adhere to the probes in liquids that result in sticky or waxy substances, leading to inaccurate static level measurements. Investing in oleophobic probes that don’t stick or performing routine cleaning can assist guarantee float sensors are accurate.

Sensors for capacitive tank levels
Capacitive sensors will be the final category we discuss. These sensors consist of two electrodes, which are conductive probes that protrude into your tank. These probes track variations in capacitance when the fluid level in the tank rises and falls to determine the amount of fluid present.

The adaptability of capacitive tank level sensors is one of its main selling points. They can be applied to a variety of media, including solids and powders that aren’t liquids. They are also comparatively affordable. Capacitive sensors fall somewhere between radar/float sensors and hydrostatic sensors in terms of cost compared to the other sensors we’ve covered.

 

It’s crucial to be aware of the sensitivity and susceptibility of capacitive sensors before making a purchase. Capacitive level sensor readings can be impacted by temperature, humidity, and fluid type. Capacitive sensors provide another degree of operational complexity by requiring operators to calibrate equipment while tanks are both empty and full.

Keeping the Big Picture in Mind
All of this was just thrown at you. But let’s not lose sight of the main goal: you want better tank level information so that you can make business decisions more quickly. Choosing the right sensors for your tanks is crucial to achieving this objective.

To assist you in choosing the optimum tank level sensor for your application, we have created this summary matrix. For your project, use it to find the best tank level sensor.

Why Choose Water Line Controls

All of our water level controls and water level control systems are assembled right here in the U.S.A. where we monitor every step of the process.

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Written by webtechs

Types of Automation for Oilfield Water Management

Automation Oil & Gas Sustainability & ESG Water & Wastewater Oilfield Waterfield engineer water wastewater pipeline valve control It’s a good time to be an oilfield water services company. Oil prices have stabilized above $100/bbl, the US rig count is the highest it’s been since pre-pandemic times, and the combination of domestic water shortages and ESG fund growth places a premium on sustainable water use.

All together, oil & gas producers are willing to pay a premium for quality oilfield water management services so they can continue to ramp drilling programs using recycled and reused produced and flowback water.

As the market for oilfield water services grows, so too does competition. Despite the labor shortage, the oilfield water services market is growing, with water management stalwarts such as Select Energy Services (7%), Oilfield Water Logistics (25%), DHI (22%), and Breakwater (20%) showing strong headcount growth over the last 2 years. Nearly every week it seems a new water transfer or water midstream company pops up.

Rising competition means established companies and newcomers alike will be looking for an edge to outpace their competition. In our last blog, we discussed why we think that automation is a great way for oilfield water management companies to differentiate. In this one, we want to talk more about what we mean by “automation,” breaking the idea down into 3 core categories.

The 3 categories of automation are:

  • Remote Monitoring
  • Remote Control
  • Autonomous Operations

Let’s talk about what each is, and the benefits it offers for oilfield water services companies.

Remote Monitoring for Oilfield Water Services

As the name implies, remote monitoring is a concept that involves using sensors and transmitters to relay up-to-date operational information back to human operators to enable oversight from a distance.

In oilfield water management applications, this usually looks like installing wireless level, temperature, pressure, and flow sensors and transmitting the data they create via long-range wireless networks like cellular or satellite. Once transmitted, data is visualized in software tools that helps operators prioritize their operations. In certain cases, operators may also remotely monitor existing PLCs or RTUs that are connected to equipment like pumps or compressors.

In simple terms, Remote Monitoring connects assets to people, regardless of the distance between them.

Remote monitoring has many safety, sustainability, and efficiency benefits. It allows oilfield water service technicians to avoid higher-risk behaviors and windshield time, and it generally decreases the time to insight by getting information in front of operators more quickly. Furthermore, remote monitoring can enable water transfer and treatment companies to share information with their customers in real-time.

Of course, Remote Monitoring only provides information to operators. It’s what they do with that information that matters, which leads us to the next level of automation.

Remote Control

Remote Control reverses the flow of information created by Remote Monitoring. Instead of connecting assets up to people, Remote Control connects people back to their assets, giving them the ability to actuate changes in real-time whether they are 100 feet or 100 miles from the asset.

In oilfield water applications, Remote Control generally looks like connecting equipment controls –  such as relays, VSDs, or stepping actuators – to a remote connectivity network such as cellular or SCADA. Operators then use software to send commands to these equipment controls, actuating changes.

The benefits of Remote Control essentially “double up” on the benefits of Remote Monitoring by completing the trip back to the asset and offering the same safety, sustainability, and efficiency benefits. 

With Remote Monitoring and Remote Control, there is always a human in the loop. The human applies their experience and logic to infer necessary actions from Remote Monitoring systems and, in some cases, take those actions via Remote Control systems.

In many cases, humans should be in the loop. But in others, it can be beneficial to take humans out of the loop, which takes us to the next and final level of automation.

Autonomous Operations

Autonomous Operations involve both Monitoring & Control, but instead of human logic placed between them, we instead insert machine logic.

Certain operational tasks are highly repeatable, and the logic to complete them is routine and well-understood. In this case, Autonomous Operations can be used to connect insights to actions more quickly.

In oilfield water management applications, Autonomous Operations generally looks like connecting those things we are remotely monitoring, like pressure, temperature, level, and flow, to those things we are remotely controlling, like pumps and valves. In between these things we used algorithms and logic to determine how and when changes are made.

Of course, when implementing Autonomous Operations, it’s always a good idea to include oversight. This brings us full circle, back to Remote Monitoring & Control. By adding remote monitoring characteristics, such as alarming, to Autonomous Operations, we can determine if the machine logic has failed to achieve the desired state. Furthermore, we can take action through emergency shutdowns, to stop unsafe autonomous operations.

Is automation right for you?

There are many more examples of how Remote Monitoring, Remote Control, and Autonomous Operations can be applied in oilfield water services. Not every application will require any or all of these types of automation. Still, oilfield water companies look to carve out more efficiency, drive sustainability programs, or improve safety numbers will benefit from adding automation in certain cases.

Choose the type of automation that provides the most benefit. In many cases, Remote Monitoring serves as a great starting point, opening up opportunities to discover where the higher “levels” of automation can provide benefit.

Source

https://blog.wellaware.us/blog/the-three-types-of-automation-for-oilfield-water-management

Waterline Controls™

Our level sensors and controls aren’t just for use in residential potable water holding tanks; some of the other applications include cooling towers, sump pumps, wastewater, boilers, water storage tanks, and building fire protection water tanks.

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Written by webtechs

Why Install a Sump Pump Check Valve?

Why Do Sump Pump Float Switches Fail?

Pumping Efficiency

When the float switch signals the pump to start, it forces the pump to push water through the valve, and out through the discharge pipe. When the water level drops, the float switch signals the pump to stop, stopping the water. Gravity then causes the water that is in the discharge pipe to drain back into the pit. 

The check valve is there to prevent the pump from having to re-pump that volume of water over again. Eliminating this issue will save on electricity costs. 

Pump Protection

Short cycling of a sump means that the pump turns on and off too quickly or too frequently. Short cycling causes the pump motor to run hotter. Heat is an enemy of electric motors and can shorten the life of a sump pump significantly. By installing a check valve, it will reduce the risk of short cycling, especially in smaller size sump basins. A check valve will extend the life of the sump pump, and save you money. 

Location

The most suitable location for a sump pump check valve is between 8″ up from the pumps discharge to approximately 12″ above floor level. Installation above the floor level is convenient for easy inspection, servicing, or replacement of the valve. You want to install a check valve 6″ above the pump discharge when installed down inside the sump basin to allow for the drilling of air release or weep holes to protect against air lock for sump pumps that do not have a built-in air lock prevention system. 

Always refer to the sump pump manufacturers installation instructions. 

Installing the sump check valve down in the sump basin below the cover can reduce the noise caused by water hammer if a standard gravity closing valve is installed, however, making inspections and servicing is not not nearly as convenient.

Improper Installation or Not Installing one at all

Not having a sump pump check valve installed causes the water in the discharge pipe to empty back into the sump pump pit. This makes the water level in the sump pit rise and a high water level can cause the pump to run more often, increasing your energy costs.

If the check valve is installed in the incorrect spot such as too high up on the discharge pipe, the pump will empty the pit during the run cycle but when it shuts off, the water below the check valve will drain back into the basin causing the water level to rise very quickly. When that happens, it will trigger the float switch to start the pump again right away, eventually wearing out your pump prematurely. 

Sump pump check valves are available in three basic types, shown in the pictures below. Each type is available in a variety of sizes and connection types.

Source

https://blog.boshart.com/why-are-sump-pump-check-valves-important

Types of Metering Devices
Written by webtechs

What’s The Best Tank Level Sensor?

If you follow technological advancement in the workplace, you’ve probably heard about the Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT is fundamentally altering the game, and now is the time to participate.

But where do you even begin? Tank level monitoring is one example.

Tank level monitoring (TLM) is an excellent first step towards becoming familiar with the IoT, whether you’re tracking frac tank levels for a well stimulation project or monitoring a straightforward water tank. The objective of tank level monitoring, as with any IoT project, is to gather accurate and trustworthy data so that you can take action and produce results. People won’t trust your tank monitoring system if your data is inaccurate, lacking, or late, and you won’t receive the desired business outcomes.

Tank level sensors are the “bedrock” of any solution for remote tank monitoring. Your sensors are the first stop on the data route for tank level monitoring since they produce the information that eventually supports decision-making. Nothing else matters if your tank level sensors don’t get reliable data. The greatest analytics and most attractive dashboards cannot compensate for subpar tank sensors.

Garbage in, garbage out, as the saying goes.

We wanted to discuss how to select the best tank level sensor for your project because of how crucial tank level sensors are to your whole tank monitoring system. You may purchase accurate and trustworthy tank sensors that generate excellent field data without spending a fortune with a little help.

Five Typical Tank Level Sensor Types

Tank level sensors come in five different categories:

Water-pressure sensors
Ultrasound detectors
Infrared sensors
Float detectors
Sensitive capacitors

Your application will determine which tank level sensor is ideal, so we’ll outline the main benefits and drawbacks of each sensor to assist you in making an informed decision for your tank level monitoring project.

Sensors for Hydrostatic Tank Level

A tried-and-true method for obtaining affordable, precise tank level data is using hydrostatic tank level sensors. These sensors are used to gauge the fluid column’s hydrostatic pressure. Typically, hydrostatics are mounted to discharge piping at the bottom of tanks, submerged in the liquid at the tank bottom.

Hydrostatic tank level sensors can be installed in various types of tanks without the need to create a new sensor because they are affordable, accurate, power-efficient, and have variable ranges.

Unfortunately, because hydrostatic sensors are frequently entirely submerged in liquid, they can experience greater failure rates. This can be quite difficult, especially with corrosive or caustic solutions. The cable gland, where fluids can enter and short circuit the delicate electronics that power the sensor, is one of the most frequent locations for failure in hydrostatic sensors.

Tank level ultrasonic sensors

Ultrasonic tank level sensors, as their name suggests, assess liquid levels using sound waves. They are installed on top of your tanks, use ultrasonic waves to “bounce” off the liquids’ surfaces, and gauge level by timing how long it takes to hear the “echo.”

The fact that ultrasonic sensors are non-contact, meaning they don’t make direct contact with the liquid in the tank, is one of its key advantages. Fluid compatibility is less of a concern, and they can function effectively in tanks where the liquid contains mixers or other moving mechanical components (note that the mixers must be off for accurate level readings, as sloshing and turbulence interfere with ultrasonic sensors).

Additionally, the cost of these sensors is reasonable, ranging from $300 to $400 per sensor. If you want greater performance or hazardous area certifications, though, budget closer to $1,000.

The fact that ultrasonic sensors use a lot of electricity is one of their key drawbacks. They can need 10-100 times as much power as hydrostatic sensors, hence they are often not appropriate for battery-powered installations.

Additionally, compared to other sensors, ultrasonic sensors typically require more upkeep. They require precise installation, maintenance of a dead band or “blanking zone” between the sensor and the fluid, and periodic cleaning of the detecting device (some fluids can create a film that affects performance)

Last but not least, noise interference is a major threat to ultrasonic sensors. The ultrasonic waves that travel to and from your sensors can encounter problems if there is foam or vapor present.

Tank level sensors using radar

In that they gauge tank levels by the amount of time it takes radio waves to travel between the sensors and fluid surfaces, radar sensors are comparable to ultrasonic sensors in this regard. Like ultrasonic sensors, radar sensors are non-contact, which appeals to operators. However, compared to their sound-based predecessors, radar sensors are more accurate and better equipped to withstand interference because of more precise electronics.

 

Radar sensors are often substantially more expensive when compared to the other two gadgets we’ve discussed so far. A competent radar tank level sensor should cost more than $2,000 in total. Radar still requires a substantial blanking zone between the bottom of the sensor and the top of the tank despite the more precise electronics. It can be challenging to obtain precise measurements as tanks fill due to the fact that light waves move so much more quickly than sound.

One advantage of radar sensors is their ability to measure fluid interfaces, such as the presence of oil in water. Even a small amount of emulsion between the interface can be taken into account by more sophisticated electronics while maintaining reliable measurements.

Sensors for Float Tank Level

Float sensors extend a probe into the liquids near the bottom of your tank, and they have continuous detecting elements along the probe that are activated by floats. Float tank sensors may be made to be extremely accurate using this approach. They can even monitor fluid interfaces by utilizing numerous floats for various liquid densities because they don’t suffer from noise or interference issues.

Float sensors, on the other hand, can be very pricey. The price of a float sensor is almost immediately inversely correlated with tank height. You might pay $1,000–$2,000 for shorter tanks (less than 5 feet tall). On the other hand, larger tanks exceeding 25 feet may cost up to $3,000 or more.

“Sticking” is one problem that float tank sensors may have. Although some manufacturers’ recent technological innovations have addressed this issue in some circumstances, it can still arise in certain circumstances. For instance, floats may adhere to the probes in liquids that result in sticky or waxy substances, leading to inaccurate static level measurements. Investing in oleophobic probes that don’t stick or performing routine cleaning can assist guarantee float sensors are accurate.

Sensors for capacitive tank levels
Capacitive sensors will be the final category we discuss. These sensors consist of two electrodes, which are conductive probes that protrude into your tank. These probes track variations in capacitance when the fluid level in the tank rises and falls to determine the amount of fluid present.

The adaptability of capacitive tank level sensors is one of its main selling points. They can be applied to a variety of media, including solids and powders that aren’t liquids. They are also comparatively affordable. Capacitive sensors fall somewhere between radar/float sensors and hydrostatic sensors in terms of cost compared to the other sensors we’ve covered.

It’s crucial to be aware of the sensitivity and susceptibility of capacitive sensors before making a purchase. Capacitive level sensor readings can be impacted by temperature, humidity, and fluid type. Capacitive sensors provide another degree of operational complexity by requiring operators to calibrate equipment while tanks are both empty and full.

Importance of Fire Safety and Prevention Planning
Written by webtechs

Flow Measurement

Flow measurement is the quantification of bulk fluid movement. Flow can be measured in a variety of ways. The common types of flowmeters with industrial applications are listed below:

 

  1. a) Obstruction type (differential pressure or variable area)
  2. b) Inferential (turbine type)
  3. c) Electromagnetic
  4. d) Positive-displacement flowmeters, which accumulate a fixed volume of fluid and then count the number of times the volume is filled to measure flow.
  5. e) Fluid dynamic (vortex shedding)
  6. f) Anemometer
  7. g) Ultrasonic
  8. h) Mass flowmeter (Coriolis force).

Flow measurement methods other than positive-displacement flowmeters rely on forces produced by the flowing stream as it overcomes a known constriction, to indirectly calculate flow. Flow may be measured by measuring the velocity of fluid over a known area. For very large flows, tracer methods may be used to deduce the flow rate from the change in concentration of a dye or radioisotope.

Water metering

Water metering is the practice of measuring water use. Water meters measure the volume of water used by residential and commercial building units that are supplied with water by a public water supply system. They are also used to determine flow through a particular portion of the system.

In most of the world water meters are calibrated in cubic metres (m3) or litres,[1] but in the United States and some other countries water meters are calibrated in cubic feet (ft.3) or US gallons on a mechanical or electronic register. Modern meters typically can display rate-of-flow in addition to total volume.

Several types of water meters are in common use, and may be characterized by the flow measurement method, the type of end-user, the required flow rates, and accuracy requirements.

Waterline Controls™

Our level sensors and controls aren’t just for use in residential potable water holding tanks; some of the other applications include cooling towers, sump pumps, wastewater, boilers, water storage tanks, and building fire protection water tanks.

Importance of Fire Safety and Prevention Planning
Written by webtechs

Fire Water Systems

A fire sprinkler system is an active fire protection method, consisting of a water supply system, providing adequate pressure and flowrate to a water distribution piping system, onto which fire sprinklers are connected. Although historically only used in factories and large commercial buildings, systems for homes and small buildings are now available at a cost-effective price. Fire sprinkler systems are extensively used worldwide, with over 40 million sprinkler heads fitted each year. In buildings completely protected by fire sprinkler systems, over 96% of fires were controlled by fire sprinklers alone.

A firewater system generally has four main sections:

1. A supply of firewater. This can come from storage tanks, a firewater lagoon, or a natural body of water such as the sea or a lake or river.

2.A pumping system that provides a sufficient flow of water to extinguish the fire.

3.A header network of pipes, often in the form of a ring main that transfers the water from the pumps to the fire.

4.Hydrants, nozzles, sprinklers, or other local devices for directing the firewater to the location of the emergency.

Source 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_sprinkler_system

Waterline Controls™

Our level sensors and controls aren’t just for use in residential potable water holding tanks; some of the other applications include cooling towers, sump pumps, wastewater, boilers, water storage tanks, and building fire protection water tanks.

Sewage Lift Station Costs
Written by webtechs

Standard vs. Quiet Sump Pump Check Valve

It’s difficult to perceive the difference between a Standard Check Valve and a Quiet Check Valve, but it’s easy to grasp the distinction because it’s in the name. A Standard Check Valve is placed if you hear a loud noise whenever the pump stops. This noise is the check valve closing, which causes a slamming sensation as the water reverses direction in the discharge pipe after the pump stops. If you have never noticed it, you probably have a Quiet Check Valve.

Let’s take it a step further and compare the advantages of installing a Standard Check Valve with a Quiet Check Valve, which will make it easier for you to determine what is ideal for your home.

What is a standard check valve for a sump pump?

A Standard Check Valve safeguards your sump and sewage pump installations against backflow. The angled seat reduces the distance the flapper must travel from the open to closed position. When closing, significantly reduce the force with which the flapper touches the seat. The tilted seat design reduces the flapper’s travel distance, hence reducing flow reversal, noise, and possibly damaging hydraulic shock (water hammer). This, combined with corrosion-resistant non-metallic components, produces a durable and dependable valve.

The graphic below depicts the closing action of gravity. Clearly, there will be a flow reversal when the pump stops, until the poppet reaches its fully closed position.

Definition of a Quiet Sump Pump Verify Valves?

When ultra-quiet operation is necessary, a Quiet Check Valve is an excellent option. Quiet Check Valves are identical to ordinary check valves, with the addition of a spring-loaded hinged flapper mechanism that compels the flapper to fully close against fluid flow when the pump is turned off. This quick closing motion against pressure eliminates noise caused by hydraulic shock before flow reversal may occur (water hammer).

The spring-assisted closing action prevents flow reversal when the pump is turned off. The poppet moves to its fully closed position before to the complete cessation of water flow.

It boils down to individual preference

The Standard Check Valve vibrates when the pump cycles and is resistant to corrosion. Providing a longer-lasting check valve and the assurance that you can hear your sump pump operating.

The Quiet Check Valve’s spring-loaded flapper design removes noise, resulting in a silent sump pump. Providing a peaceful environment throughout the day, morning and night.

Why Choose Water Line Controls

All of our water level controls and water level control systems are assembled right here in the U.S.A. where we monitor every step of the process.

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